Access to Parks and Outdoor Recreation Areas Tentative Agenda

Access to Parks and Outdoor Recreation Areas
April 17-20, 2012
Lake Mead, NV

Tentative Agenda*

*This agenda is tentative and subject to change without notice. A field exercise is scheduled. Participants should be prepared to be outdoors for 2-6 hours. Lunch is on your own each day.

April 17, 2012

7:30 a.m. Check in

8:00 a.m. Welcome and Overview

Why are we here?
Upon completion of this session, learners will be able to:
Identify prevalent attitudes in society that stigmatize persons with disabilities;
Understand the importance of terminology that may affect the perception of persons with disabilities; and
Develop an understanding of and sensitivity to various disabilities.

Who are People with Disabilities?
Upon completion of this session, learners will be able to:
Identify and discuss common misconceptions and attitudinal barriers toward people with mobility, visual and hearing impairments;
Discuss the general characteristics and functional limitations of various disability groups; and
Describe methods people with disabilities utilize to navigate in the environment, communicate and participate in parks and recreation.

From Federal Legislation to Agency Policy, Practice and Procedure
Upon completion of this session, learners will be able to:
Summarize purposes and objectives of the Architectural Barriers Act; Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act and the Americans with Disabilities Act;
Discuss the key principles and terms including program access, most integrated setting, when viewed in its entirety and reasonable modification;
Discuss the defenses to Section 504 and the ADA; and
Understand the relationship between the visitor experience, program access and facilities.

Accessibility Standards and Guidelines
Upon completion of this session, learners will be able to:
Discuss, as a general overview, the accessibility standards applicable under the ABA and ADA;
Discuss how the functional limitations of disabilities are addressed in the accessibility standards;
Discuss the most common technical provisions and their application to retrofits in existing facilities; and
Discuss options for barrier removal in existing facilities.


April 18, 2012

Universal Design
Upon completion of this session, learners will be able to:
Define the concept of universal design;
Distinguish between universal design and accessible design;
Discuss the principles of universal design; and
Identify examples of universal design in park and recreation environments.

Standards Exercise: Applying the Standards in Our Environment
Upon completion of this session, learners will be able to:
Apply the accessibility standards to existing facilities in a modified assessment situation;
Be familiar with and use the measuring tools in the assessment process; and
Discuss the key findings from an assessment to formulate corrective actions to improve access at the facility.

Pathways to Recreation
Upon completion of this session, learners will be able to:
Review the scoping and technical provisions for accessible routes applicable to the built environment; and
Understand how standards and proposed guidelines differ based on the type of recreation environment including outdoor recreation access routes, beach access routes, trails, sport field/court routes, and playground access routes.

Surfacing Accessible Recreation Areas
Upon completion of this session, learners will be able to:
Discuss the surface characteristics of “firm” and “stable”;
Discuss the major considerations for selecting a surface material for particular recreation environments including installation, maintenance, temporary use, weather, and cost; and
Apply the major selection considerations to the purchasing process.

Camping and Picnic Areas
Upon completion of this session, learners will be able to:
Discuss the general scoping and technical provisions for campgrounds and picnic areas;
Discuss application of the conditions for exceptions; and
Understand how the proposed guidelines and principles of universal design have been applied in various projects.

Trails and Scenic Viewing Areas
Upon completion of this session, learners will be able to:
Discuss the general scoping and technical provisions for outdoor developed areas, trails and scenic viewing area;
Discuss application of the conditions for exceptions; and
Understand how the proposed guidelines and principles of universal design have been applied in various projects.

Waterfronts: Beaches, Boating and Fishing
Upon completion of this session, learners will be able to:
Discuss the general scoping and technical provisions for beaches, boating facilities and fishing piers;
Discuss application of the conditions for exceptions beaches and gangways; and
Understand how the proposed guidelines and principles of universal design have been applied in various projects.

April 19, 2012

Access to Historic Sites
Upon completion of this session, learners will be able to:
Outline current rules, regulations, standards and policy regarding accessibility in historic sites.
Identify and discuss key issues with regard to historic sites as they relate to architectural and programmatic access.
Identify means by which access can be provided in historic areas while preserving the historic integrity of the site.

Outdoor Classroom
Upon completion of the outdoor classroom, learners will be able to:
Discuss the scoping and technical provisions required in each type of facility;
Measure constructed features to begin evaluation of compliance with the proposed standards;
Identify barriers for people with disabilities; and
Propose solutions to improve the visitor experience and access for people with disabilities.

April 20, 2012

Common Errors and Omissions in New Construction & Renovations
Upon completion of this session, learners will be able to:
Identify common design errors found in new construction and alterations to existing facilities; and
Discuss strategies to avoid common errors and omissions when applying the accessibility standards and guidelines to new construction and alteration projects.

Planning Exercise

Products and Resources
Upon completion of this session, learners will be able to:
Identify a variety of products that can be used specifically in recreation environments to achieve access.
Discuss the appropriateness and inappropriateness of various product types to solving specific access problems.
Distinguish between appropriate and inappropriate products and understand why some products advertised as accessible may not work.
Discuss the need for independent consumer use of products and appliances.
Identify resources such as agencies, publications, databases and the Internet to assist in product and service searches.

Planning for Action
Upon completion of this session, learners will be able to:
Describe the process of identifying site use activities and characteristics of the visitor.
Discuss the issue of examining a site for accessibility in a comprehensive manner.
Discuss importance of consumer involvement in all phases of the planning process.

Noon Training ends.